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Recent blog posts

It's never easy to terminate an employee. Even if you have clear cause to do so, you may wonder about the potential ramifications of your actions. You may wonder if it will somehow affect your business, especially if the employee was subject to a non-compete or non-disclosure agreement. You may wonder whether he or she will file a wrongful termination claim against you, even though the law is on your side.

Truthfully, these are very real risks when you terminate an employee. However, you may be able to take steps to help ensure that your employee departs on the best terms possible. In some cases, you may have time to properly document a termination, but in others, that opportunity simply doesn't exist. How you address the situation could make all the difference.

When the termination needs to happen on the spot

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Over the years, your company has grown and had its ups and downs. When your business first started out, you entered into a partnership because you and your partner felt that path was right for the goals and ambitions of the business. However, you may have come to the point, as many partners do, where you feel that the business relationship no longer works.

After much discussion, you and your partner may choose to dissolve the partnership. Of course, this type of relationship is not one from which you can simply walk away. Indeed, you must take the proper legal steps to ensure that the dissolution takes place in a manner that protects the soon-to-be former partners and the company.

One stays, one goes

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When you first started your business, you undoubtedly gave much thought to the type of business entity you wanted to create. Because you were starting out small, you likely did not believe that you needed a business type that involved many complex aspects. After doing your research, you picked an entity that you believed best suited the needs of your company at the time.

Of course, now that your business has been up and running for some time, you may wonder whether your entity still suits those business needs. However, you may also wonder whether changing your business type is possible or necessary. To answer the first question, it is entirely possible to alter your type of entity. As for necessity, many reasons could lead to such a change.

Reasons to change

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For various reasons, you may have decided that your company should utilize noncompete agreements when working to prevent your trade secrets or other important information from falling into the hands of your competitors. These agreements certainly have their uses, and if you believe that having such a contract could work toward protecting your company's best interests, it may prove wise to gain more information on these agreements.

In particular, you may want to focus on the enforceability of any contracts you create. Many business owners feel surprised to find out that their noncompete agreements do not meet enforceability requirements. As a result, they may not provide as much protection as hoped.

How to ensure enforceability

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Because you hold both your family and your business close, you certainly want to ensure that you take care of them. As a result, when you begin thinking about your retirement or possible demise, you will want to know that your family and company remain in good hands. Fortunately, business succession planning could prove useful in this respect.

When thinking about who you want to take over your business and how you want the company to continue to operate, you will likely have many aspects to consider. Wanting to keep the business within the family is understandable, especially if your children already work as part of the company. However, you still need to make sure your successor is the right fit for the job.

Willingness

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